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Reservoirs in the United States

Water Supply Paper 1360-A

By:
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  • Document: Document (pdf)
  • Plates:
    • Plate 1 (pdf) Map of United States showing drainage areas and index numbers
    • Plate 2 (pdf) Map of northeastern part of Louisville area showing location of observation wells
    • Plate 3 (pdf) Map of northeastern part of Louisville area showing elevations of bedrock in feet above mean sea level (1912 adjusted)
    • Plate 4 (pdf) Sections of the Ohio River flood plain, northeastern section of Louisville area
    • Plate 5 (pdf) Map of northeastern part of Louisville area showing laboratory permeabilities in gallons per day per square foot under gradient of unity and temperature of 60°F
    • Plate 6 (pdf) Map of northeastern part of Louisville area showing elevations of piezometric surface, August 15, 1946
    • Plate 19 (pdf) Geologic map of the Townsend Valley, Montana
    • Plate 20 (pdf) Map of the Townsend Valley, Montana, showing the location of wells, land under irrigation, land proposed for irrigation, waterlogged areas, and contour of the ground-water surface
    • Plate 22 (Sheet 1) (pdf) Map of the Kaycee Irrigation Project, Wyoming, showing surficial geology and location of wells
    • Plate 22 (Sheet 2) (pdf) Map of the Kaycee Irrigation Project, Wyoming, showing surficial geology and location of wells
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  • Download citation as: RIS | Dublin Core

Abstract

Reservoir storage facilities in the United States play an important part in the national economy. Storage facilities have enabled the country to utilize to a much fuller extent one of the most valuable natural resources: water. During recent years the construction of reservoirs has continued at a high rate. This report shows the status of these facilities on January 1, 1954, and describes briefly some of the reasons for growth of reservoir facilities in the United States.

Descriptive data are given for reservoirs having a capacity of 5, 000 acre-feet or more and for natural lakes having a usable capacity of 5,000 acre-feet or more. Included are reservoirs and lakes completed as of January 1, 1954, and reservoirs under construction on that date. The total number of such reservoirs and lakes is 1, 300.

A descriptive list of reservoirs in the United States was first published by the United States Geological Survey in March 1948. That report, Geological Survey Circular 23, entitled Reservoirs in the United States, included reservoirs completed as of January 1, 1947. Since January 1, 1947, reservoirs representing a total usable capacity of 115,000,000 acre-feet, or an increase of 71 percent, have been constructed or are under construction. Data about these new reservoirs are presented herein, and the data shown for reservoirs constructed before 1947 have been corrected on the basis of the latest available survey to determine reservoir capacity.

The total usable capacity of reservoirs and lakes included in this compilation amounts to 278, 120, 000 acre-feet, and the corresponding surface area totals 11, 046, 000 acres.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Reservoirs in the United States
Series title:
Water Supply Paper
Series number:
1360
Chapter:
A
Year Published:
1956
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Government Printing Office
Publisher location:
Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s):
Utah Water Science Center
Description:
Report: v, 99 p.; 9 Plates (in 10 Sheets): 50.19 x 33.95 inches or smaller
Larger Work Type:
Report
Larger Work Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Larger Work Title:
Contributions to the hydrology of the United States, 1955 (Water Supply Paper 1360)
Public Comments:
Subtitle: Revising and superseding Geological Survey Circular 23, Reservoirs in the United States, by G. Earl Harbeck, Jr.: March 1948
Country:
United States