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Cloudburst floods in Utah, 1850-1938, with a chapter on physiographic features

Water Supply Paper 994

By:
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  • Document: Document (pdf)
  • Plates:
    • Plate 1 (pdf) Map of Utah showing physiographic divisions
    • Plate 6 (pdf) Land classification of Utah, showing distribution of cloudburst floods
    • Plate 7 (pdf) United States weather maps covering cyclonic storm of September 21-25, 1930
    • Plate 8 (pdf) United States weather maps covering cloudburst storm of August 13, 1923
    • Plate 9 (pdf) United States weather maps covering cloudburst storm of August 13, 1932
    • Plate 10 (pdf) United States weather maps covering storms of August 23-30, 1932
    • Plate 11 (pdf) Map of Utah showing distribution of cloudburst floods and precipitation
    • Plate 12 (pdf) Plan of Willard Creek showing topography and vegetal cover, Box Elder County, Utah
    • Plate 18 (pdf) Plans and profiles of Cottonwood and Pleasant Creeks, Sanpete County, Utah
    • Plate 19 (pdf) Plan and profile of Manti Creek, including north fork, Sanpete County, Utah
    • Plate 22 (pdf) Location and number of damaging cloudburst floods reported in Utah from 1837 to 1938, inclusive, with dates of settlement of communities affected
    • Plate 23 (pdf) Map of Utah showing distribution of cloudburst floods and population
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Abstract

Five years after the first settlement was made in Utah, at Salt Lake City in 1847, it became manifest to the settlers both there and at Manti that "cloudbursts" were of common occurrence in this region. Other settlements were made and gradually expanded on the steep alluvial fans of the mountain streams, and reports of cloudburst storms and their attendant floods became increasingly numerous as farms and homes were damaged by them.

In 1890 the theory was advanced that these floods occurred because the sheep and cattle had eaten off the vegetation in the hills, leaving nothing to hold the water back. This indictment of man's flocks and herds has become so common that during the past 20 years considerable study has been given to it. Most of the study, however, has been devoted to runoff from the catchment basins and factors involved in its control and little of it to an adequate scientific analysis of the relationship between physiographic and geologic features and the meteorologic phenomena involved in the storms

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Cloudburst floods in Utah, 1850-1938, with a chapter on physiographic features
Series title:
Water Supply Paper
Series number:
994
Year Published:
1946
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Government Printing Office
Publisher location:
Washington, D.C.
Contributing office(s):
Utah Water Science Center
Description:
v, 128 p.; 12 Plates: 25.00 x 31.50 inches or smaller
Country:
United States
State:
Utah