thumbnail

Early life history of the yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), in the Red Lakes, Minnesota

Transactions of the American Fisheries Society

By:
and
DOI:10.1577/1548-8659(1954)84[249:ELHOTY]2.0.CO;2

Links

Abstract

The early life history of the yellow perch, an important commercial species in the Red Lakes, Minnesota, has been studied with special reference to length at scale formation, growth rate during first season of life, and food habits as they relate to growth and survival. Scales are fully imbricated in the area of 12th to 14th lateral line scales at 24 millimeters total length. There is a wide annual varition in first season's growth which is not correlated with growth in older fish. Body-scale relationship is rectilinear from 24 to 280 millimeters. Length-weight relationship during the first year is expressed by the equation W = 0.6198 × 10−5 L3.1251 which is very similar to that describing the relationship in later years. Stomach analysis indicates food is primarily plankton but in some seasons fish may be strongly dependent on bottom forms. Variations in food availability appear to be associated with changes in growth and may have a major influence on survival.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Early life history of the yellow perch, Perca flavescens (Mitchill), in the Red Lakes, Minnesota
Series title:
Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
DOI:
10.1577/1548-8659(1954)84[249:ELHOTY]2.0.CO;2
Volume:
84
Issue:
1
Year Published:
1955
Language:
English
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Contributing office(s):
Great Lakes Science Center
Description:
12 p.
First page:
249
Last page:
260
Online Only (Y/N):
N
Additional Online Files (Y/N):
N