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Introduction to the effects of wildland fire on aquatic ecosystems in the Western USA

Forest Ecology and Management

By:
, , , and
DOI:10.1016/S0378-1127(03)00050-1

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Abstract

The management of wildfire has long been controversial. The role of fire and fire-related management in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems has become an important focus in recent years, but the general debate is not new. In his recent book, Stephen Pyne (2001)describes the political and scientific debate surrounding the creation of the U.S. Forest Service and the emergence of fire suppression as a central tenet of wildland management. Essentially, views in the first decade of the 20th century focused on fire as good or evil: a tool that might benefit other resources or interests (e.g. Indian burning) and mitigate larger more destructive fires, or a threat to the recruitment and productivity of newly designated forest reserves. The “great fires” in the Western USA in 1910 and the associated loss of human life and property largely forged the public and political will to suppress fire on a massive scale.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
Introduction to the effects of wildland fire on aquatic ecosystems in the Western USA
Series title:
Forest Ecology and Management
DOI:
10.1016/S0378-1127(03)00050-1
Volume:
178
Issue:
1-2
Year Published:
2003
Language:
English
Publisher:
Elsevier
Publisher location:
New York, NY
Contributing office(s):
Northern Rocky Mountain Science Center
Description:
3 p.
Larger Work Type:
Article
Larger Work Subtype:
Journal Article
Larger Work Title:
Forest Ecology and Management
First page:
1
Last page:
3
Country:
United States
Online Only (Y/N):
N
Additional Online Files (Y/N):
N