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A new species of warbler (Parulidae) from Puerto Rico

The Auk

By:
and
https://doi.org/10.2307/4084056

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Abstract

The West Indies are among the best known of the world's tropical regions, and our knowledge of the distribution of indigenous land birds in the Greater Antilles has been thought to be nearly complete (Bond, 1956). The last new species from the Antilles were described in 1927, the results of work in the Zapata Swamp of Cuba (Barbour and Peters, 1927) and the isolated Morne de la Selle in Haiti (Wetmore, 1927). No new species has been found in Puerto Rico in this century, and it would seem unlikely that a bird could escape detection on the island, which has a human population density now approaching 320 per square km, and less than 3,300 ha (0.4 percent of land area) of virgin forest remaining (Wads- worth, 1949). Nevertheless the discovery of extant populations of the Puerto Rican Whip-poor-will (Caprimulgus noctitherus) by Reynard (1962) and the Puerto Rican Plain Pigeon (Columba inornata wetmorei) by Leopold (1963), both previously presumed extinct (Bond, 1956, 1961), indicated that the inventory of the Puerto Rican avifauna might be incomplete.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Article
Publication Subtype:
Journal Article
Title:
A new species of warbler (Parulidae) from Puerto Rico
Series title:
The Auk
DOI:
10.2307/4084056
Volume:
89
Issue:
1
Year Published:
1972
Language:
English
Publisher:
American Ornithological Society
Contributing office(s):
Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description:
18 p.
First page:
1
Last page:
18