Rapid increases in mercury concentrations in the eggs of mallards fed methylmercury

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
By: , and 

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Abstract

To determine how quickly breeding birds would have to feed in a mercury-contaminated area before harmful concentrations of mercury, as methylmercury, built up in their eggs, we fed female mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) a control diet or diets containing 0.5, 1, 2, 4, or 8 μg/g mercury (on what was close to a dry weight basis) as methylmercury chloride for 23 d. After 18 d on their respective mercury diets, the eggs of mallards fed 0.5, 1, 2, 4, or 8 μg/g mercury contained 97.8, 86.0, 89.9, 88.9, and 85.9%, respectively, of the peak concentrations reached after 23 d. Depending on the dietary concentration of mercury, no more than approximately a week may be required for harmful concentrations (0.5–0.8 μg/g, wet weight) to be excreted into eggs.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Rapid increases in mercury concentrations in the eggs of mallards fed methylmercury
Series title Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Volume 28
Issue 9
Year Published 2009
Language English
Publisher Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Publisher location Brussels, Belgium
Contributing office(s) Patuxent Wildlife Research Center
Description 3 p.
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
First page 1979
Last page 1981