Temporal and maternal effects on reproductive ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas)

Southwestern Naturalist
By: , and 

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Abstract

We used mixed-effects models to examine relationships of reproductive characteristics of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) to improve population modeling and conservation planning for this species. Neonates from larger litters had lower mass, and mass of neonates also was affected by random variation among mothers. Length of mother did not affect relative mass of litters; however, our data suggest that longer mothers expended less reproductive effort per offspring than shorter mothers. We detected random variation in length of neonates among mothers, but these lengths were not related to length of mother or size of litter. Mean size of litter varied among years, but little evidence existed for a relationship between size of litter or mass of litter and length of mother. Sex ratios of neonates did not differ from 1:1.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Temporal and maternal effects on reproductive ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas)
Series title Southwestern Naturalist
DOI 10.1894/GC-205.1
Volume 56
Issue 1
Year Published 2009
Language English
Publisher Southwestern Association of Naturalists
Contributing office(s) Western Ecological Research Center
Description 6 p.
First page 29
Last page 34