Use of non-alpine anthropogenic habitats by American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in western Oregon, USA

Western North American Naturalist
By:  and 

Links

Abstract

The American pika (Ochotona princeps Richardson) has long been characterized in field guides and popular literature as an obligate inhabitant of alpine talus and as having relatively low dispersal capability. However, recent work reveals pikas to have broader habitat associations than previously reported. Over a large portion of the western slope of the Cascade Range in Oregon, pikas inhabit relatively low-elevation sites far from alpine areas and frequently occur in rocky man-made habitats such as roadcuts or rock quarries. We present observations of pikas in these previously overlooked habitats and discuss implications for (1) the proposed listing of the American pika as an endangered or threatened species; (2) furthering our understanding of pika population dynamics, habitat associations, and dispersal capabilites; and (3) management of federal, state, and private forest lands.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Use of non-alpine anthropogenic habitats by American pikas (Ochotona princeps) in western Oregon, USA
Series title Western North American Naturalist
DOI 10.3398/064.071.0114
Volume 71
Issue 1
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum
Publisher location Provo, UT
Contributing office(s) Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description 7 p.
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Western North American Naturalist
First page 106
Last page 112
Country United States
State Oregon