Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change

Nature Eduction Knowledge
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Abstract

As the evidence for warming climate became better established in the latter part of the 20th century (IPCC 2001), some scientists raised the alarm that large quantities of methane (CH4) might be liberated by widespread destabilization of climate-sensitive gas hydrate deposits trapped in marine and permafrost-associated sediments (Bohannon 2008, Krey et al. 2009, Mascarelli 2009). Even if only a fraction of the liberated CH4 were to reach the atmosphere, the potency of CH4 as a greenhouse gas (GHG) and the persistence of its oxidative product (CO2) heightened concerns that gas hydrate dissociation could represent a slow tipping point (Archer et al. 2009) for Earth's contemporary period of climate change.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Methane hydrates and contemporary climate change
Series title Nature Eduction Knowledge
Volume 2
Issue 12
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher Nature Publishing Group
Publisher location London, UK
Contributing office(s) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Nature Eduction Knowledge
First page 12