Functional ecology of free-living nitrogen fixation: A contemporary perspective

Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics
By: , and 

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Abstract

Nitrogen (N) availability is thought to frequently limit terrestrial ecosystem processes, and explicit consideration of N biogeochemistry, including biological N2 fixation, is central to understanding ecosystem responses to environmental change. Yet, the importance of free-living N2 fixation—a process that occurs on a wide variety of substrates, is nearly ubiquitous in terrestrial ecosystems, and may often represent the dominant pathway for acquiring newly available N—is often underappreciated. Here, we draw from studies that investigate free-living N2 fixation from functional, physiological, genetic, and ecological perspectives. We show that recent research and analytical advances have generated a wealth of new information that provides novel insight into the ecology of N2 fixation as well as raises new questions and priorities for future work. These priorities include a need to better integrate free-living N2 fixation into conceptual and analytical evaluations of the N cycle's role in a variety of global change scenarios.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Functional ecology of free-living nitrogen fixation: A contemporary perspective
Series title Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics
DOI 10.1146/annurev-ecolsys-102710-145034
Volume 42
Year Published 2011
Language English
Publisher Annual Reviews
Publisher location Palo Alto, CA
Contributing office(s) Southwest Biological Science Center
Description 24 p.
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics
First page 489
Last page 512