Differences in survival and growth in hatchery and stream environments, and in maturation of residuls in a stream, between progeny of hatchery and wild steelhead (Study sites: Brushy Fork Creek and Dworshak Hatchery; Stocks:Dworshak hatchery and Fish Creek wild; Year classes: 1992 and 1993): Chapter 1

By: , and 
Edited by: Stephen P. RubinReginald R. ReisenbichlerLisa A. Wetzel, and Michael C. Hayes

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Abstract

Freshwater survival in hatchery and natural rearing environments was compared between progeny of hatchery (H) and wild (W) steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss from the Clearwater River drainage in Idaho. Adults from Dworshak National Fish Hatchery and wild adults from Fish Creek fish were artificially spawned, and their progeny were genetically marked at the PEPA allozyme locus and released together as unfed fry in production facilities at the hatchery and in Brushy Fork Creek, also in the Clearwater River drainage, in a common garden design. Survival was higher for H than for W progeny at the hatchery but lower for H than for W progeny in Brushy Fork, indicating reduced fitness of the hatchery population for natural rearing and suggesting domestication as the cause. Survival at the hatchery was lower than is typical due to disease outbreaks. Survival of the first year-class of experimental fish to smolt release was only 18%. Survival of H fish was 3.8 times that of W fish under these poor survival conditions. All fish from the second year-class died halfway through the scheduled 10 month rearing period. Survival of H fish was 5.2 times that of W fish to when 1% of the initial fry were still alive indicating that W fish succumbed to the epizootic sooner than did H fish. Emigrants from the Brushy Fork study reach were sampled for three years and fish residing in the study reach were sampled for six years following fry release. Most emigrants were one or two years old and too small to be smolts (mean fork length at age-2 = 93 mm). Survival in Brushy Fork was lower for H than for W fish of the first year-class. Survival of the second year-class was higher for H than for W fish during the first two months in the stream but was lower for H than for W fish thereafter, and net survival from release to ages 3 and older was also lower for H than for W fish if our emigrant samples were representative (periods of inoperative emigrant traps prevented certainty about this). Differences between progeny groups were also found for growth (H>W) and condition (H>W) in the hatchery and downstream migration success of hatchery-reared fish after release (H>W), and for growth (H<W for one year-class; H>W for the other), condition (H>W), downstream dispersal (H>W for one year-class; H=W for the other), and maturation of residuals (ovaries weight was greater for H than for W females at ages 4 and 5; testes weight was less for H than for W age-3 males of one year-class) in Brushy Fork. A thunderstorm-induced power outage interrupted flow to the incubation trays at the hatchery and compromised a major tenet of the common garden design for the second year-class, possibly contributing to the inconsistency in relative survivals in Brushy Fork between year-classes. The storm caused the incubation environment to differ between the stocks as a result of reduced oxygen levels and substantially higher densities for H alevins. This difference was illustrated by a 55% loss for H fish during the event, about twice that for W fish.

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Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Other Government Series
Title Differences in survival and growth in hatchery and stream environments, and in maturation of residuls in a stream, between progeny of hatchery and wild steelhead (Study sites: Brushy Fork Creek and Dworshak Hatchery; Stocks:Dworshak hatchery and Fish Creek wild; Year classes: 1992 and 1993): Chapter 1
DOI 10.3996/022014-JFWM-013.S8
Year Published 2012
Language English
Publisher Bonneville Power Administration
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 62 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Title Genetic differences in growth, migration, and survival between hatchery and wild steelhead and Chinook salmon: Final report. Performance period: June 1991 to December 2005
First page 17
Last page 79
Country United States
State Idaho
Other Geospatial Brushy Fork Creek
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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