Effects of sea-level rise on salt water intrusion near a coastal well field in southeastern Florida

Ground Water
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Abstract

A variable-density groundwater flow and dispersive solute transport model was developed for the shallow coastal aquifer system near a municipal supply well field in southeastern Florida. The model was calibrated for a 105-year period (1900 to 2005). An analysis with the model suggests that well-field withdrawals were the dominant cause of salt water intrusion near the well field, and that historical sea-level rise, which is similar to lower-bound projections of future sea-level rise, exacerbated the extent of salt water intrusion. Average 2005 hydrologic conditions were used for 100-year sensitivity simulations aimed at quantifying the effect of projected rises in sea level on fresh coastal groundwater resources near the well field. Use of average 2005 hydrologic conditions and a constant sea level result in total dissolved solids (TDS) concentration of the well field exceeding drinking water standards after 70 years. When sea-level rise is included in the simulations, drinking water standards are exceeded 10 to 21 years earlier, depending on the specified rate of sea-level rise.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Effects of sea-level rise on salt water intrusion near a coastal well field in southeastern Florida
Series title Ground Water
DOI 10.1111/j.1745-6584.2012.01008.x
Volume 51
Issue 5
Year Published 2013
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Florida Water Science Center-Ft. Lauderdale
Description 23 p.
Larger Work Type Article
Larger Work Subtype Journal Article
Larger Work Title Ground Water
First page 781
Last page 803
Country United States
State Florida
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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