Thresholds for protecting Pacific Northwest ecosystems from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen: state of knowledge report

Natural Resource Report NPS/PWRO/NRR--2014/823
By: , and 

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Abstract

The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service manage areas in the states of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington – collectively referred to in this report as the Pacific Northwest - that contain significant natural resources and provide many recreational opportunities. The agencies are mandated to protect the air quality and air pollution-sensitive resources on these federal lands. Human activity has greatly increased the amount of nitrogen emitted to the atmosphere, resulting in elevated amounts of nitrogen being deposited in park and forest ecosystems. There is limited information in the Pacific Northwest about the levels of nitrogen that negatively affect natural systems, i.e., the critical loads. The National Park Service and U.S. Forest Service, with scientific input from the U.S. Geological Survey, have developed an approach for accumulating additional nitrogen critical loads information in the Pacific Northwest and using the data in planning and regulatory arenas. As a first step in that process, this report summarizes the current state of knowledge about nitrogen deposition, effects, and critical loads in the region. It also describes ongoing research efforts and identifies and prioritizes additional data needs.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Federal Government Series
Title Thresholds for protecting Pacific Northwest ecosystems from atmospheric deposition of nitrogen: state of knowledge report
Series title Natural Resource Report
Series number NPS/PWRO/NRR--2014/823
Volume 2014/823
Year Published 2014
Language English
Publisher National Park Service
Publisher location Fort Collins, CO
Contributing office(s) Forest and Rangeland Ecosystem Science Center
Description vii, 45 p.
Country United States
State Idaho;Oregon;Washington
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