GHASTLI-determining physical properties of sediment containing natural and laboratory-formed gas hydrate: Chapter 24

By: , and 
Edited by: Michael D. Max

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Abstract

Gas-hydrate samples have been recovered at about 16 areas worldwide (Booth et al., 1996). However, gas hydrate is known to occur at about 50 locations on continental margins (Kvenvolden, 1993) and is certainly far more widespread so it may represent a potentially enormous energy resource (Kvenvolden, 1988). But adverse effects related to the presence of hydrate do occur. Gas hydrate appears to have caused slope instabilities along continental margins (Booth et al., 1994; Dillon et al., 1998; Mienert et al., 1998; Paull & Dillon, (Chapter 12; Twichell & Cooper, 2000) and it has also been responsible for drilling accidents (Yakushev and Collett, 1992). Uncontrolled release of methane could affect global climate (Chapter 11), because methane is 15–20 times more effective as a “greenhouse gas” than an equivalent concentration of carbon dioxide. Clearly, a knowledge of gas-hydrate properties is necessary to safely explore the possibility of energy recovery and to understand its past and future impact on the geosphere.
Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title GHASTLI-determining physical properties of sediment containing natural and laboratory-formed gas hydrate: Chapter 24
DOI 10.1007/978-94-011-4387-5_24
Volume 5
Year Published 2003
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Coastal and Marine Geology Program
Description 12 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Other Government Series
Larger Work Title Natural gas hydrate in oceanic and permafrost environments
First page 311
Last page 322
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