Method- and species-specific detection probabilities of fish occupancy in Arctic lakes: Implications for design and management

Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
By: , and 

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Abstract

Studies examining species occurrence often fail to account for false absences in field sampling. We investigate detection probabilities of five gear types for six fish species in a sample of lakes on the North Slope, Alaska. We used an occupancy modeling approach to provide estimates of detection probabilities for each method. Variation in gear- and species-specific detection probability was considerable. For example, detection probabilities for the fyke net ranged from 0.82 (SE = 0.05) for least cisco (Coregonus sardinella) to 0.04 (SE = 0.01) for slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus). Detection probabilities were also affected by site-specific variables such as depth of the lake, year, day of sampling, and lake connection to a stream. With the exception of the dip net and shore minnow traps, each gear type provided the highest detection probability of at least one species. Results suggest that a multimethod approach may be most effective when attempting to sample the entire fish community of Arctic lakes. Detection probability estimates will be useful for designing optimal fish sampling and monitoring protocols in Arctic lakes.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Method- and species-specific detection probabilities of fish occupancy in Arctic lakes: Implications for design and management
Series title Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
DOI 10.1139/cjfas-2012-0527
Volume 70
Issue 7
Year Published 2013
Language English
Publisher NRC Research Press
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center Biology WTEB
Description 8 p.
First page 1055
Last page 1062
Country United States
State Alaska
Other Geospatial North Slope
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N