Mechanical and thermal control of cleating and shearing in coal: examples from the Alabama coalbed methane field, USA

By: , and 

Links

Abstract

Natural fractures provide most of the interconnected macroporosity in coal. Therefore, understanding the characteristics of these fractures and the associated mechanisms of formation is essential for effective coalbed methane exploration and field management. Natural fractures in coal can be divided into two general types: cleat and shear structures. Cleat has been studied for more than a century, yet the mechanisms of cleat formation remain poorly understood (see reviews by Close, 1993; Laubach et al.,1998). An important aspect of cleating is that systematic fracturing of coal is takes place in concert with devolatization and concomitant shrinkage of the coal matrix during thermal maturation (Ammosov and Eremin, 1960). Coal, furthermore, is a mechanically weak rock type that is subject to bedding-plane shear between more competent beds like shale, sandstone, and limestone. Yet, the significance of shear structures in coal has only begun to attract scientific interest (Hathaway and Gayer, 1996; Pashin, 1998).

Study Area

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Mechanical and thermal control of cleating and shearing in coal: examples from the Alabama coalbed methane field, USA
DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-1062-6_19
Year Published 1999
Language English
Publisher Kluwer Academic
Publisher location Dordrecht
Description 23 p.
Larger Work Type Book chapter
Larger Work Subtype Book Chapter
Larger Work Title Coalbed Methane: Scientific, Environmental and Economic Evaluation
First page 305
Last page 327
Country United States
State Alabama
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N