Species-specific and transgenerational responses to increasing salinity in sympatric freshwater gastropods

Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
By: , and 

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Abstract

Freshwater salinization is a global concern partly attributable to anthropogenic salt contamination. The authors examined the effects of increased salinity (as NaCl, 250-4,000 µS/cm, specific conductance) on two sympatric freshwater gastropods (Helisoma trivolvis and Physa pomillia). Life stage sensitivities were determined by exposing naive eggs or naive juveniles (through adulthood and reproduction). Additionally, progeny eggs from the juvenile-adult exposures were maintained at their respective parental salinities to examine transgenerational effects. Naive H. trivolvis eggs experienced delayed development at specific conductance > 250 µS/cm; reduced survivorship and reproduction were also seen in juvenile H. trivolvis at 4,000 µS/cm. Survival and growth of P. pomilia were not affected by increased salinity following egg or juvenile exposures. Interestingly, the progeny of H. trivolvis exposed to higher salinity may have gained tolerance to increased salinity whereas P. pomilia progeny may have experienced negative transgenerational effects. The present study demonstrates that freshwater snail species vary in their tolerance to salinization and also highlights the importance of multigenerational studies, as stressor impacts may not be readily apparent from shorter term exposures.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Species-specific and transgenerational responses to increasing salinity in sympatric freshwater gastropods
Series title Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
DOI 10.1002/etc.1972
Volume 31
Issue 11
Year Published 2012
Language English
Publisher Elsevier Science
Publisher location New York, NY
Contributing office(s) Coop Res Unit Atlanta
Description 8 p.
First page 2517
Last page 2524
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N