Water availability and subsidence in California's Central Valley

San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science
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Abstract

California’s Central Valley covers about 52,000 square kilometers (km2) and is one of the most productive agricultural regions in the world. More than 250 different crops are grown in the broad alluvial filled structural trough, with an estimated value exceeding $20 billion per year (Faunt 2009) (Figure 1). Central Valley agriculture depends on state and federal water systems that divert surface water, predominantly originating from Sierra Nevada snowmelt, to agricultural fields. Because the valley is semi-arid and the availability of surface water varies substantially from year to year, season to season, and from north to south, agriculture, as it grew, developed a reliance on groundwater for irrigation.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Water availability and subsidence in California's Central Valley
Series title San Francisco Estuary and Watershed Science
Volume 13
Issue 3
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher University of California at Davis
Contributing office(s) California Water Science Center
Description 8 p.
Country United States
State California
Other Geospatial Central Valley
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N