Case Study, California Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis corturniculus): Science Foundation Chapter 5, Appendix 5.1 in The Baylands and climate change: What can we do?

Prepared by the San Franciso Bay Area Wetlands Ecosystem Goals Project
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Abstract

The Black Rail is the smallest member of the avian family Rallidae and has a wide-ranging but highly scattered distribution throughout the New World. Of five subspecies, two occur in North America—the Eastern Black Rail (L.j. jamaicensis) and the California Black Rail (L.j. coturniculus). Throughout its range, the Black Rail is a secretive inhabitant of tidal and freshwater wetlands and rarely ventures out from the cover of dense marsh vegetation. It is more likely to be heard than seen; spontaneous vocalizations tend to be concentrated in the nesting season and are much less common during the rest of the year.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Other Government Series
Title Case Study, California Black Rail (Laterallus jamaicensis corturniculus): Science Foundation Chapter 5, Appendix 5.1 in The Baylands and climate change: What can we do?
Year Published 2015
Language English
Publisher California State Coastal Conservancy
Contributing office(s) San Francisco Bay-Delta, Western Ecological Research Center
Description 13 p.
Larger Work Title The Baylands and climate change: What can we do? Baylands Ecosystem Habitat Goals science update 2015
Country United States
State California
Other Geospatial San Francisco Bay
Online Only (Y/N) Y
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