Soda Creek springs - metamorphic waters in the eastern Alaska Range

Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey
By: , and 

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Abstract

The Soda Creek springs are a group of small, cold mineral springs on the southern flank of the eastern Alaska Range. The spring waters contain anomalous concentrations of carbon dioxide, sodium, chlorine, sulfate, boron, and ammonia and are actively precipitating deposits of calcite and aragonite. Sparingly present in these deposits are mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite clays and zeolite minerals. Low-temperature
metamorphic reactions in subjacent marine sedimentary rocks of Jurassic and Cretaceous age may have produced the fluids and silicate minerals. With only a few exceptions, cool bicarbonate-rich springs in Alaska are concentrated south of the Denali fault system in south-central Alaska, southeastern Alaska, and along the Kaltag-Tintina fault system. These areas are characterized by active or recently active
tectonism, major faults and folds, and an abundance of marine sedimentary rocks.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Soda Creek springs - metamorphic waters in the eastern Alaska Range
Series title Journal of Research of the U.S. Geological Survey
Volume 1
Issue 5
Year Published 1973
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Description 6 p.
First page 523
Last page 528
Country United States of America
State Alaska
Other Geospatial Soda Creek springs
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N
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