Early life history and survival of natural subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 1995

By: , and 

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Abstract

Snake River fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchustshawytscha have declined in abundance the last three decades and now managers are seeking methods to restore the population, Estimates of adult fish returning to the Snake River prior to 1957 number in the tens of thousands (Irving and Bjornn 1981), compared to a range of about 300-750 for 1991-1995 (Lavoy 1995). As a result, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act (USFWS 1988) in 1992 (NMFS 1992) and the Snake and Clearwater rivers were identified as critical habitat (NMFS 1995). Resource managers are attempting to recover the population of Snake River fall chinook salmon, but the fish are restricted to a small part of historical production areas.

The objectives of this segment of our study were to (1) describe the early life history characteristics of naturally produced subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake and Clearwater rivers, and (2) estimate survival for juvenile fall chinook salmon emigrating from the Snake and Clearwater rivers to the tail race of Lower Granite Dam.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype State/Local Government Series
Title Early life history and survival of natural subyearling fall chinook salmon in the Snake and Clearwater rivers in 1995
Chapter 2
DOI 10.2172/544742
Year Published 1997
Language English
Publisher U. S. Department of Energy - Bonneville Power Administration
Publisher location Portland, OR
Description 30 p.
Larger Work Title Identification of the spawning, rearing, and migratory requirements of fall chinook salmon in the Columbia River basin, annual report 1995
First page 18
Last page 47
Country United States
State Idaho, Oregon, Washington
Other Geospatial Clearwater River, Snake River
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N