Year-to-year fluctuation of the spring phytoplankton bloom in south San Francisco Bay: An example of ecological variability at the land-sea interface

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Abstract

Estuaries are transitional ecosystems at the interface of the terrestrial and marine realms. Their unique physiographic position gives rise to large spatial variability, and to dynamic temporal variability resulting, in part, from a variety of forces and fluxes at the oceanic and terrestrial boundaries. River flow, in particular, is an important mechanism for delivering watershed-derived materials such as fresh water, sediments, and nutrients; each of these quantities in turn directly influences the physical structure and biological communities of estuaries. With this setting in mind, we consider here the general proposition that estuarine variability at the yearly time scale can be caused by annual fluctuations in river flow. We use a “long-term” (15-year) time series of phytoplankton biomass variability in South San Francisco Bay (SSFB), a lagoon-type estuary in which phytoplankton primary production is the largest source of organic carbon (Jassby et al. 1993).

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Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Year-to-year fluctuation of the spring phytoplankton bloom in south San Francisco Bay: An example of ecological variability at the land-sea interface
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4615-1769-6_10
Year Published 1995
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) San Francisco Bay-Delta, Pacific Regional Director's Office, Toxic Substances Hydrology Program
Description 11 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Ecological time
First page 139
Last page 149
Country United States
State California
Other Geospatial South San Francisco Bay
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N