Formation of methane and carbon dioxide from dimethylselenide in anoxic sediments and by a methanogenic bacterium

Applied and Environmental Microbiology
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Abstract

Anaerobic San Francisco Bay salt marsh sediments rapidly metabolized [14C]dimethylselenide (DMSe) to 14CH4 and 14CO2. Addition of selective inhibitors (2-bromoethanesulfonic acid or molybdate) to these sediments indicated that both methanogenic and sulfate-respiring bacteria could degrade DMSe to gaseous products. However, sediments taken from the selenium-contaminated Kesterson Wildlife Refuge produced only 14CO2 from [14C]DMSe, implying that methanogens were not important in the Kesterson samples. A pure culture of a dimethylsulfide (DMS)-grown methylotrophic methanogen converted [14C]DMSe to 14CH4 and14CO2. However, the organism could not grow on DMSe. Addition of DMS to either sediments or the pure culture retarded the metabolism of DMSe. This effect appeared to be caused by competitive inhibition, thereby indicating a common enzyme system for DMS and DMSe metabolism. DMSe appears to be degraded as part of the DMS pool present in anoxic environments. These results suggest that methylotrophic methanogens may demethylate methylated forms of other metals and metalloids found in nature.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Formation of methane and carbon dioxide from dimethylselenide in anoxic sediments and by a methanogenic bacterium
Series title Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume 52
Issue 5
Year Published 1986
Language English
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Contributing office(s) San Francisco Bay-Delta, Pacific Regional Director's Office
Description 6 p.
First page 1031
Last page 1036
Online Only (Y/N) N
Additional Online Files (Y/N) N