Sediment transport due to extreme events: The Hudson River estuary after tropical storms Irene and Lee

Geophysical Research Letters
By: , and 

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Abstract

Tropical Storms Irene and Lee in 2011 produced intense precipitation and flooding in the U.S. Northeast, including the Hudson River watershed. Sediment input to the Hudson River was approximately 2.7 megaton, about 5 times the long-term annual average. Rather than the common assumption that sediment is predominantly trapped in the estuary, observations and model results indicate that approximately two thirds of the new sediment remained trapped in the tidal freshwater river more than 1 month after the storms and only about one fifth of the new sediment reached the saline estuary. High sediment concentrations were observed in the estuary, but the model results suggest that this was predominantly due to remobilization of bed sediment. Spatially localized deposits of new and remobilized sediment were consistent with longer term depositional records. The results indicate that tidal rivers can intercept (at least temporarily) delivery of terrigenous sediment to the marine environment during major flow events.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Sediment transport due to extreme events: The Hudson River estuary after tropical storms Irene and Lee
Series title Geophysical Research Letters
DOI 10.1002/2013GL057906
Volume 40
Issue 20
Year Published 2013
Language English
Publisher AGU Publications
Contributing office(s) Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center
Description 5 p.
First page 5451
Last page 5455