Microscopic functional anatomy: Integumentary system: Chapter 17

By:
Edited by: Gary K. Ostrander

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Abstract

Many of the features of the fish integument can only be observed microscopically. Because there are over 20,000 living fishes, mostly higher bony fishes (teleosts), a great diversity exists in the microscopic anatomy of the integument. This chapter presents several examples from varied taxonomic groups to illustrate the variation in morphological features. As in all vertebrate epidermis, the fundamental structural unit is the epithelial cell. This is the only constant feature, as a great diversity of cell types exists in the various fish taxa. Some of these include apocrine mucous cells and a variety of other secretory cells, ionocytes, sensory cells, and wandering cells such as leukocytes. The dermis consists essentially of two sets of collagen fibers arranged in opposing geodesic spirals around the body. The dermis of most fishes is divided into two major layers. The upper (outer) layer, the stratum spongiosum or stratum laxum, is a loose network of connective tissue, whereas the lower layer, the stratum compactum, is a dense layer consisting primarily of orthogonal collagen bands. There are also specialized dermal elements such as chromatophores scales, and fin rays.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Microscopic functional anatomy: Integumentary system: Chapter 17
DOI 10.1016/B978-012529650-2/50023-8
Year Published 2000
Language English
Publisher Academic Press
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 36 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title The laboratory fish
First page 271
Last page 306