Comparison of traditional and molecular methods for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum

By: , and 
Edited by: C.O. Cunningham

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Abstract

Bacterial kidney disease (BKD) caused by Renibacterium salmoninarum occurs in most parts of the world where wild or cultured salmonid fishes are present. Several extensive reviews have been written on the pathogen and the disease (Fryer and Sanders, 1981; Austin and Austin, 1987; Elliott et al., 1989; Evelyn, 1993; Evenden et al., 1993; Fryer and Lannan, 1993). Bacterial kidney disease can cause serious mortality in juvenile salmonids in both fresh water and seawater, and also in prespawning adults. Although the chronic nature of the disease has hindered accurate estimates of fish losses, particularly in feral fish populations, BKD is one the most important bacterial diseases affecting cultured salmonids, with reported losses as high as 80% in stocks of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) and 40% in stocks of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) (Evenden et al., 1993).

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Comparison of traditional and molecular methods for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum
DOI 10.1007/978-94-017-2315-2_7
Year Published 2002
Language English
Publisher Kluwer Academic Publishers
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 53 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Molecular diagnosis of salmonid diseases
First page 157
Last page 209
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