Natural selection after release from a hatchery leads to domestication in steelhead, Oncorhynchus mykiss

By: , and 

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Abstract

Genetic theory and data suggest that sea ranching of anadromous salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp. and Salmo spp.) results in domestication (increased fitness in the hatchery program) accompanied by a loss of fitness for natural production. We tested for genetic differences in growth, survival, and downstream migration of hatchery and wild steelhead (O. mykiss) reared together in a hatchery. We found little or no difference in survival during hatchery rearing but substantial differences in growth and subsequent downstream migration. Intense natural selection after release from the hatchery favored fish that had performed well (e.g. grew fast) in the hatchery. This selection in the natural environment genetically changes (domesticates) the population because at least some of the performance traits are heritable. Domestication should improve the economic efficiency for producing adult hatchery fish but compromise conservation of wild populations when hatchery fish interbreed with wild fish.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Natural selection after release from a hatchery leads to domestication in steelhead, Oncorhynchus mykiss
DOI 10.1002/9780470751329.ch27
Year Published 2004
Language English
Publisher Wiley
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 13 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Stock enhancement and sea ranching: Developments, pitfalls and opportunities
First page 371
Last page 383