The potential for water savings through the control of saltcedar and Russian olive: Chapter 3

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Abstract

This chapter discusses the components of the water budget for a riparian system containing large stands of saltcedar or Russian olive—that is, how water is used by the plant community and how that use affects both streamflow volume and groundwater levels. The relation of water availability to the hydrologic cycle and geomorphic setting in the Western United States, as well as the importance of scale, time, natural variation in climate, and the role of human activity in relation to water availability are discussed. Published literature on evapotranspiration rates is summarized to provide historical context for past efforts to bring about changes in water availability through control of saltcedar and Russian olive. Specifically, this chapter deals with the feasibility of water savings, defined here as the potential increase in water available for beneficial human use (both subsurface and surface waters) as a consequence of a change in vegetation and land-cover characteristics brought about by the removal or reduction of saltcedar and Russian olive.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title The potential for water savings through the control of saltcedar and Russian olive: Chapter 3
Year Published 2010
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Contributing office(s) Fort Collins Science Center
Description 15 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Larger Work Title Saltcedar and Russian Olive Control Demonstration Act Science Assessment (Scientific Investigations Report 2009–5247)
First page 33
Last page 47