Toward the use of remote sensing and other data to delineate functional types in terrestrial and aquatic systems

By:  and 
Edited by: A.F. Bouwman

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Abstract

This chapter discusses the role that remotely sensed data play in improving the ability to document the distribution of global land cover types. If the relationships between the cover types and trace gas fluxes can be determined, then the dynamics of these fluxes can be established. The chapter discusses important aquatic systems—such as wetlands—and the land–water interface. Researchers have a wide variety of options available to utilize the remotely sensed data for the scaling of trace gas fluxes between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and the atmosphere. An important application of remote sensing for improving the understanding of trace gas fluxes is the classification of land cover types. Remote sensing is a powerful tool for the collection of environmental data. When combined with other more conventional data, they can be analyzed to extract a wide variety of environmental themes. Models can be developed for improving the fundamental understanding of the dynamics of complex interconnected systems that support and sustain life on earth.

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Toward the use of remote sensing and other data to delineate functional types in terrestrial and aquatic systems
Chapter 6
DOI 10.1016/S0167-5117(98)80027-X
Volume 24
Year Published 1999
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center
Description 26 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Approaches to scaling of trace gas fluxes in ecosystems
First page 125
Last page 150