The highest global concentrations and increased abundance of oceanic plastic debris in the North Pacific: Evidence from seabirds

By:  and 
Edited by: James M. Coe and Donald B. Rogers

Links

Abstract

Plastic pollution has risen dramatically with an increase in production of plastic resin during the past few decades. Plastic production in the United States increased from 2.9 million tons in I960 to 47.9 million tons in 1985 (Society of the Plastics Industry 1986). This has been paralleled by a significant increase in the concentration of plastic particles in oceanic surface waters of the North Pacific from the 1970s to the late 1980s (Day and Shaw 1987; Day et al. 1990a). Research during the past few decades has indicated two major interactions between marine life and oceanic plastic: entanglement and ingestion (Laist 1987). Studies in the last decade have documented the prevalence of plastic in the diets of many seabird species in the North Pacific and the need for further monitoring of those species and groups that ingest the most plastic (Day et al. 1985).

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title The highest global concentrations and increased abundance of oceanic plastic debris in the North Pacific: Evidence from seabirds
Chapter 6
ISBN 978-1-4613-8486-1
DOI 10.1007/978-1-4613-8486-1_8
Year Published 1997
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Alaska Science Center
Description 10 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Marine debris: Sources, impacts, and solutions
First page 71
Last page 80
Public Comments This book is a volume in the Springer Series on Environmental Management