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San Francisco 's Golden Gate: A bridge between historically distinct coyote (Canis latrans) populations?

Western North American Naturalist
By: , and 

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Abstract

Although coyotes (Canis latrans) are wellknown for their adaptability to human-modified landscapes (Riley et al. 2003), as with any medium to large-sized carnivore, they typically avoid highly urbanized areas (Crooks 2002), preferring instead to use habitat fragments linked by vegetated corridors (Tigas et al. 2002). However, recent observations of coyotes in San Francisco indicate their willingness to traverse even the most densely urbanized terrain (Rubenstein 2003). Herein we use DNA to show, in an extreme example, that an adult male coyote caught in the northern tip of the San Francisco peninsula traversed the 2-km Golden Gate Bridge, potentially linking historically distinct coyote populations.

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title San Francisco 's Golden Gate: A bridge between historically distinct coyote (Canis latrans) populations?
Series title Western North American Naturalist
Volume 66
Issue 2
Year Published 2006
Language English
Contributing office(s) Western Ecological Research Center
Description 2 p.
First page 263
Last page 264
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