San Francisco Bay living shorelines: Restoring Eelgrass and Olympia Oysters for habitat and shore protection: Chapter 17

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Abstract

Living shorelines projects utilize a suite of sediment stabilization and habitat restoration techniques to maintain or build the shoreline, while creating habitat for a variety of species, including invertebrates, fish, and birds (see National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA] 2015 for an overview). The term “living shorelines” denotes provision of living space and support for estuarine and coastal organisms through the strategic placement of native vegetation and natural materials. This green coastal infrastructure can serve as an alternative to bulkheads and other engineering solutions that provide little to no habitat in comparison (Arkema et al. 2013; Gittman et al. 2014; Scyphers et al. 2011). In the United States, the living shorelines approach has been implemented primarily on the East and Gulf Coasts, where it has been shown to enhance habitat values and increase connectivity between wetlands, mudflats, and subtidal lands, while reducing shoreline erosion during storms and even hurricanes (Currin et al. 2015; Gittman et al. 2014, 2015).

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title San Francisco Bay living shorelines: Restoring Eelgrass and Olympia Oysters for habitat and shore protection: Chapter 17
ISBN 9781498740029
Year Published 2017
Language English
Publisher CRC Press
Contributing office(s) Western Ecological Research Center
Description 30 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Title Living shorelines: The science and management of nature-based coastal protection
First page 333
Last page 362