Re-introduction of Bobcats to Cumberland Island, Georgia, USA: Status and lessons learned after 25 years

By: , and 
Edited by: Pritpal S. Soorae

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Abstract

The bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a medium-sized spotted cat (4 - 18 kg), widely distributed in North America. Bobcats are legally harvestable in most of their range, and are currently classified as Least Concern by IUCN and listed in Appendix II of CITES, due to similarity of appearance with other spotted cat species. Bobcats in the coastal plain region of Georgia, USA, occur at densities of 0.4 - 0.6 per km2. The most common prey of bobcats across most of their range are cottontail rabbit species (Sylvilagus sp). Cumberland Island is the largest of Georgia’s Atlantic coastal barrier islands. Since 1972, approximately 80% of the island has been administered by the National Park Service as Cumberland Island National Seashore (CINS). The island has a subtropical climate and contains approximately 85 km2of upland habitat. It is accessible only by boat or small plane. Thirty-two bobcats were released on CINS during 1988 – 1989.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Re-introduction of Bobcats to Cumberland Island, Georgia, USA: Status and lessons learned after 25 years
ISBN 978-2-8317-1633-6
Year Published 2013
Language English
Publisher IUCN
Publisher location Gland, Switzerland
Contributing office(s) Coop Res Unit Leetown
Description 6 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Global re-introduction perspectives: 2013: Further case-studies from around the globe
First page 235
Last page 240
Country United States
State Georgia
Other Geospatial Cumberland Island