Concepts: Integrating population survey data from different spatial scales, sampling methods, and species

By: , and 
Edited by: K. Ullas Karanth and James D. Nichols

Links

Abstract

Conservationists and managers are continually under pressure from the public, the media, and political policy makers to provide “tiger numbers,” not just for protected reserves, but also for large spatial scales, including landscapes, regions, states, nations, and even globally. Estimating the abundance of tigers within relatively small areas (e.g., protected reserves) is becoming increasingly tractable (see Chaps. 9 and 10), but doing so for larger spatial scales still presents a formidable challenge. Those who seek “tiger numbers” are often not satisfied by estimates of tiger occupancy alone, regardless of the reliability of the estimates (see Chaps. 4 and 5). As a result, wherever tiger conservation efforts are underway, either substantially or nominally, scientists and managers are frequently asked to provide putative large-scale tiger numbers based either on a total count or on an extrapolation of some sort (see Chaps. 1 and 2).

Additional publication details

Publication type Book chapter
Publication Subtype Book Chapter
Title Concepts: Integrating population survey data from different spatial scales, sampling methods, and species
DOI 10.1007/978-981-10-5436-5_12
Year Published 2017
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center
Description 8 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Monograph
Larger Work Title Methods for monitoring tiger and prey populations
First page 247
Last page 254