Effect of N fertilization and tillage on nitrous oxide (N2O) loss from soil under wheat production

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Abstract

Nitrous oxide (N2O-N) is one of the most important gases in the atmosphere because it is 300 times more powerful than carbon dioxide in its ability to trap heat, and is a key chemical agent of ozone depletion. The amount of N2O-N emitted from agricultural fields can be quite high, depending on the complex interplay between N fertility and residue management, plant N uptake, microbial processes, environmental conditions, and wet-up and dry-down events. High N fertilizer rates generally increase yields, but may disproportionately increase N2O-N losses due to prolonged residence time in soil when not used by the crop, and incomplete decomposition of excess N-compounds by microbes. Tillage could also affect N2O-N losses through changes in soil moisture content. Though nitrogen monoxide (NO) is one form of N lost from the soil, especially under conventional tillage, this study objective was to quantify N2O loss in wheat fields from applied urea on soil under no-till (NT) versus incorporated urea under conventional till (CT).

Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype Other Report
Title Effect of N fertilization and tillage on nitrous oxide (N2O) loss from soil under wheat production
Year Published 2017
Language English
Publisher North Dakota State University
Contributing office(s) Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center
Description 2 p.
Larger Work Type Report
Larger Work Subtype Other Report
Larger Work Title Carrington Research Extension Center Annual Report, A report of agricultural research and extension in central North Dakota, Vol 58
First page 20
Last page 21