A history of trade routes and water-level regulation on waterways in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA

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Abstract

Unlike most national parks, main access to Voyageurs National Park is by boat. This remote system of interconnected waterways along the USA-Canada border was an important transportation route for thousands of years of American Indian occupation, leading up to and including the trade route of the voyageurs, or French-Canadian fur traders from around 1680 to 1870. The Ojibwe people collaborated with the voyageurs and the two cultures developed a trade network that continued to rely on these waterways. By the mid-1800s, European fashion changed, and the fur trade dwindled while the Ojibwe remained tied to the land and waters. The complexity of the waterways increased with the installation of dams on two of the natural lakes in the early 1900s. Modern water levels have affected—and in some cases destabilized—vulnerable landforms within the past century. The knowledge of these effects can be used by resource managers to weigh the consequences of hydrologic manipulation in Voyageurs National Park.

Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title A history of trade routes and water-level regulation on waterways in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, USA
DOI 10.1061/9780784481394.014
Year Published 2018
Language English
Publisher American Society of Civil Engineers
Contributing office(s) Minnesota Water Science Center
Description 12 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Conference publication
Larger Work Title World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2018
Conference Title World Environmental and Water Resources Congress 2018
Conference Location Minneapolis, MN
Conference Date June 3-7, 2018
Country United States
State Minnesota
Other Geospatial Voyageurs National Park