Survival and growth of bottomland hardwood seedlings and natural woody invaders near forest edges

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Abstract

Several oak species are frequently planted for reforestation projects in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley (LMAV), but the success of these plantings has been variable. The survival and growth of planted seed or seedlings are affected by a variety of factors, including competition, herbivory, site preparation, precipitation, planting stock quality, and planting techniques. We surveyed reforested fields in the LMAV to examine survival and growth of planted oaks and the occurrence of natural invaders that became established in these fields. Oak (Quercus spp.) densities averaged 413 stems per ha within 150 m of forest edges, as compared with 484 stems per ha between 150 to 300 m from the forest edge. Also there were higher densities of natural woody invaders near forest edges (4,234 stems per ha at 0 - 150 m compared with 2,193 stems per ha at 150-300 m). These data show that seed and seedlings proximity to a nearby forest edge has an effect on survival and growth. Since planted trees in the 0 – 150 m forest edge zone encounter high densities of natural invaders, it may be prudent to reduce the number of planted trees. Naturally occurring invaders enhance diversity and also augment depleted oak plantings near the forest edge with no added expense or effort.

Additional publication details

Publication type Conference Paper
Publication Subtype Conference Paper
Title Survival and growth of bottomland hardwood seedlings and natural woody invaders near forest edges
Year Published 2004
Language English
Publisher US Department of Agriculture
Publisher location Asheville, North Carolina
Contributing office(s) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center
Description 7 p.
Larger Work Type Book
Larger Work Subtype Conference publication
Larger Work Title Proceedings of the 12th biennial southern sivicultural research conference
First page 535
Last page 541
Conference Title 12th biennial southern sivicultural research conference
Conference Location Asheville, NC
Conference Date 2004
Country United States
State Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi