The glycoprotein, non-virion protein, and polymerase of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus are not determinants of host-specific virulence in rainbow trout

Virology Journal
By: , and 

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Abstract

Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a fish rhabdovirus belonging to the Novirhabdovirus genus, causes severe disease and mortality in many marine and freshwater fish species worldwide. VHSV isolates are classified into four genotypes and each group is endemic to specific geographic regions in the north Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Most viruses in the European VHSV genotype Ia are highly virulent for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), whereas, VHSV genotype IVb viruses from the Great Lakes region in the United States, which caused high mortality in wild freshwater fish species, are avirulent for trout. This study describes molecular characterization and construction of an infectious clone of the virulent VHSV-Ia strain DK-3592B from Denmark, and application of the clone in reverse genetics to investigate the role of selected VHSV protein(s) in host-specific virulence in rainbow trout (referred to as trout-virulence).

Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title The glycoprotein, non-virion protein, and polymerase of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus are not determinants of host-specific virulence in rainbow trout
Series title Virology Journal
DOI 10.1186/s12985-019-1139-3
Volume 16
Issue 31
Year Published 2019
Language English
Publisher BMC part of Springer Nature
Contributing office(s) Western Fisheries Research Center
Description 16 p.
First page 1
Last page 16