Petroleum hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices deployed in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and Florida keys following the Deepwater Horizon incident

Marine Pollution Bulletin
By: , and 

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Abstract

The Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill from April to July of 2010 contaminated Gulf of Mexico waters through release of an estimated 4.1 × 106 barrels of oil. Beginning in June of 2010, semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed near areas with sensitive marine habitats (Alabama Alps and Western Shelf) potentially exposed to that oil. Elevated TPAH50 concentrations, flux rates and similarity of histograms and diagnostic ratios for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from SPMDs to weathered floating oil collected during the DWH spill indicates the Alabama Alps habitats were affected. While not affected by oil from the DWH spill, the temporal pattern of PAH contamination of SPMDs deployed near the Western Shelf between July 2010 and March 2011 could indicate prevailing currents affected contaminant transport to the Western Shelf Area (East and West Flower Garden, Sonnier, and Stetson Banks) from non-DWH sources, including oil and gas exploration, shipping, and Mississippi River effluent.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Petroleum hydrocarbons in semipermeable membrane devices deployed in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and Florida keys following the Deepwater Horizon incident
Series title Marine Pollution Bulletin
DOI 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2019.110622
Edition Online First
Year Published 2019
Language English
Publisher Elsevier
Contributing office(s) Wetland and Aquatic Research Center
Country United States, Mexico
State Florida
Other Geospatial Northern Gulf of Mexico, Florida Keys