Impact of "non-lethal" tarsal clipping on bumble bees (Bombus vosnesenskii) may depend on queen stage and worker size

Journal of Insect Conservation
By: , and 

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Abstract

Recent bumble bee declines have prompted the development of novel population monitoring tools, including the use of putatively non-lethal tarsal clipping to obtain genetic material. However, the potential side effects of tarsal clipping have only been tested in the worker caste of a single domesticated species, prompting the need to more broadly test whether tarsal clipping negatively affects sampled individuals. To determine if tarsal clipping reduces queen survivorship and colony establishment, we collected wild queens of Bombus vosnesenskii and clipped tarsi from a single leg of half the individuals. We reared captive queens and estimated survivorship and nest establishment success. We also clipped tarsi of workers from a subset of colonies across a range of body sizes. We found no consistent negative effect of clipping on queen survival. In the first year, clipped nest-searching queens suffered heavy mortality, but there was no effect on foraging queens. The following year, we found no effect of clipping on queen survival or establishment. Clipping did not reduce overall worker survival but reduced survivorship for those in the smallest size quartile.

Publication type Article
Publication Subtype Journal Article
Title Impact of "non-lethal" tarsal clipping on bumble bees (Bombus vosnesenskii) may depend on queen stage and worker size
Series title Journal of Insect Conservation
DOI 10.1007/s10841-021-00297-9
Volume 25
Year Published 2021
Language English
Publisher Springer
Contributing office(s) Fort Collins Science Center
Description 7 p.
First page 195
Last page 201
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