thumbnail

Use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) to assess occurrence and estimate water concentrations of selected organic compounds in the Rio Grande from Presidio to Brownsville, Texas

Fact Sheet 100-99

By:

Links

Abstract

In Texas, the Rio Grande forms the international boundary between Mexico and the United States and extends about 2,000 kilometers from El Paso to the mouth of the Rio Grande just south of Brownsville, where the river flows into the Gulf of Mexico (fig. 1). The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) has resulted in increased industrialization and population growth on both sides of the international boundary, which in turn has focused attention on environmental issues, including water quality and quantity in the Rio Grande. Nonpoint urban and agricultural runoff and wastewater discharges from industrial and municipal facilities are potential sources of organic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Historical applications of organochlorine pesticides such as DOT and chlordane in the United States and Mexico have resulted in a continuing source of these environmentally longlived compounds in the Rio Grande Basin. In the United States, all organochlorine pesticides either have been banned entirely or have use restrictions. However, in Mexico, the organochlorine pesticide DOT is still in use, although with some application restrictions.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) to assess occurrence and estimate water concentrations of selected organic compounds in the Rio Grande from Presidio to Brownsville, Texas
Series title:
Fact Sheet
Series number:
100-99
Year Published:
1999
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Contributing office(s):
Texas Water Science Center
Description:
6 p.
Online Only (Y/N):
N
Additional Online Files (Y/N):
N