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Habitat Suitability Index Models: Gulf of Mexico American Oyster

FWS/OBS 82/10.57

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Abstract

The American or eastern oyster (Crassostrea virrinica [Gmelin]), a bivalve in the family Ostreidae, is an important commercia and recreational species along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coasts of North America and other areas (U.S. Pacific coast and Hawaii) where it has been introduced (Galtsoff 1964). It evolved over the last 25 million years (Miocene and Pliocene epochs) from an ancestral, Atlantic-Pacific species that also gave rise to the Central American oyster of the Pacific coast, Crassostrea corteziensis (Hertlein) (Stenzel 1971). It evolved to fill a eurytopic niche in coastal estuaries where it forms massive reefs in nearshore bays, sounds, lagoons, and river mouths. Its existence depends on suitable substratum (cultch and firm bottom sediments) and acceptable sal-inity conditions. The location and distribution of oyster reefs in a salt marsh-estuari ne ecosystem are not acci denta 1; rather, they result from the interacti on of many bi 01 ogi ca 1, chemica1, geo1ogi ca1, and phys i ca 1 processes (Butler 1954a; Marshall 1954; Bahr and Lanier 1981).

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
Federal Government Series
Title:
Habitat Suitability Index Models: Gulf of Mexico American Oyster
Series title:
FWS/OBS
Series number:
82/10.57
Subseries:
Habitat Suitability Index
Year Published:
1983
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
Contributing office(s):
U.S. Geological Survey
Description:
vi, 37 p.