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Fish movement ecology in high gradient headwater streams: Its relevance to fish passage restoration through stream culvert barriers

Open-File Report 2007-1140

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Abstract

Restoration of fish passage through culvert barriers has emerged as a major issue in the Pacific Northwest and nationwide, in part, because of their potential influence on fish movement. Movement is an essential mechanism by which mobile animals acquire the resources necessary for the successful completion of their life-cycles. In this report, we provide a brief review of some essential characteristics of animal movement and examples from a focal group of fishes in Washington State: salmon, trout, and char. We begin by outlining some basic characteristics of animal movement and then apply that foundation to the case of salmonid fishes. Next we consider the consequences of disrupting fish movement with human-constructed barriers, such as culverts. Finally, this body of evidence is summarized, and we propose a short list of what we view as high priority information needs to support more effective restoration of fish passage through culverts.

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Fish movement ecology in high gradient headwater streams: Its relevance to fish passage restoration through stream culvert barriers
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
2007-1140
Edition:
Revised and reprinted 2007
Year Published:
2007
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Reston, VA
Contributing office(s):
U.S. Geological Survey
Description:
iii, 37 p.