Vulnerability of National Park Service beaches to inundation during a direct hurricane landfall: Fire Island National Seashore

Open-File Report 2007-1389
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Abstract

Waves and storm surge associated with strong tropical storms are part of the natural process of barrier-island evolution and can cause extensive morphologic changes in coastal parks, leading to reduced visitor accessibility and enjoyment. Even at Fire Island National Seashore, a barrier-island coastal park in New York where extratropical storms (northeasters) dominate storm activity, the beaches are vulnerable to the powerful, sand-moving forces of hurricanes. The vulnerability of park beaches to inundation, and associated extreme coastal change, during a direct hurricane landfall can be assessed by comparing the elevations of storm-induced mean-water levels (storm surge) to the elevations of the crest of the sand dune that defines the beach system. Maps detailing the inundation potential for Category 1-4 hurricanes can be used by park managers to determine the relative vulnerability of various barrier-island parks and to assess which areas of a particular park are more susceptible to inundation and extreme coastal changes.

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Additional publication details

Publication type Report
Publication Subtype USGS Numbered Series
Title Vulnerability of National Park Service beaches to inundation during a direct hurricane landfall: Fire Island National Seashore
Series title Open-File Report
Series number 2007-1389
DOI 10.3133/ofr20071389
Year Published 2007
Language English
Publisher U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location Reston, VA
Contributing office(s) Florida Integrated Science Center - St. Petersburg
Description 8 p.
Country United States
State New York
Other Geospatial Fire Island National Seashore
Online Only (Y/N) Y
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