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Monitoring breeding and migration of neotropical migratory birds at Naval Base Coronado, Remote Training Site, Warner Springs, San Diego County, California, 5-year summary, 2013–17

Open-File Report 2018-1112

By:
https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181112

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Abstract

We operated a bird banding station on the Naval Base Coronado, Remote Training Site, Warner Springs (RTSWS), in northeastern San Diego County, California, during the bird breeding season (spring/summer) from 2013 to 2017 and during migration (fall) from 2013 to 2016. The station was established in spring 2013 as part of the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program and continued into the fall for the first 4 years as part of a long-term monitoring program for neotropical migratory birds.

We captured 705 individuals of 58 species during the MAPS/breeding season from 2013 to 2017 (12–13 days each year in April through August), 79 percent of which were newly banded during the MAPS season (555), 8 percent of which were recaptures banded in previous years (57), and 13 percent of which we released unbanded (64 hummingbirds and 29 other birds that were released or escaped prior to banding). Sixty individuals were captured more than once within a year during MAPS. Bird capture rate averaged 19 ± 1 captures per 100 net-hours (range 17–20) across 5 years. Annual species richness ranged from 28 (2017) to 42 (2014). The average species richness per day was highest in 2014 (9 ± 3) and lowest in 2016 (6 ± 2). Bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus) was the most abundant breeding species captured, followed by Spotted Towhee (Pipilo maculatus), Oak Titmouse (Baeolophus inornatus), Anna’s Hummingbird (Calypte anna), House Wren (Troglodytes aedon), Ash-throated Flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens), California Scrub-jay (Aphelocoma californica), Bewick’s Wren (Thryomanes bewickii), Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus), California Towhee (Melozone crissalis), and Western Bluebird (Sialia mexicana). Each of these 11 breeding species accounted for at least 5 percent of captures in any 1 year. Fifty-seven percent of known-sex captures were female and 43 percent were male. Thirty-three percent of known-age captures were juveniles. Peaks in number of birds captured were in the first and last weeks of April, and the greatest number of species was captured in early May.

Suggested Citation

Lynn, S., Hall, K.A., Madden, M.C., and Kus, B.E., 2018, Monitoring breeding and migration of neotropical migratory birds at Naval Base Coronado, Remote Training Site, Warner Springs, San Diego County, California, 5-year summary, 2013–17: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2018–1112, 98 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20181112.

ISSN: 2331-1258 (online)

Table of Contents

  • Executive Summary
  • Introduction 
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Discussion
  • References Cited

Additional publication details

Publication type:
Report
Publication Subtype:
USGS Numbered Series
Title:
Monitoring breeding and migration of neotropical migratory birds at Naval Base Coronado, Remote Training Site, Warner Springs, San Diego County, California, 5-year summary, 2013–17
Series title:
Open-File Report
Series number:
2018-1112
DOI:
10.3133/ofr20181112
Year Published:
2018
Language:
English
Publisher:
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher location:
Reston, VA
Contributing office(s):
Western Ecological Research Center
Description:
viii, 98 p.
Country:
United States
State:
California
County:
San Diego County
Other Geospatial:
Naval Base Coronado, Remote Training Site
Online Only (Y/N):
Y